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Posts Tagged ‘st. patrick’s day’

Last week I explained what not to do to celebrate a very New Old St. Patrick’s Day. Then Onalistus gave us some exciting history of the tensions between our dear saint and our dearer pagan brethren with some advice on how to honor that. But, now that March 17th is upon us, I know all Ye Revelers are just itching to get festive. You came to the right place.

A Short List of Everything You Can Do to be a Proper Almost Irish American

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How would this guy celebrate?

I’m a quarter Irish. I know, we all are. Well, I really am. My name is Erynn. My grandmother carried the very Irish name of Katherine Burns. So there.

Despite my total claim to Irish heritage, I have trouble getting excited about St. Patrick’s day. New Old Traditions is a little on the fence about Saint Patrick’s day in general, which we’ll get into more in the next week. Still, the holiday is a pretty good excuse for revelry and I do feel a bit connected to it. However, before donning my “Kiss me, I’m Irish” button,  I need to get some ill will out of the way. And let me be clear about my grievances, it’s not that I have a problem with non-Irish Americans getting excited about this holiday (being only just barely Irish myself with no actual current family connection to ye olde Éireann), and I also have no problems with the drinking or the parades. Both drinking and parades are something We Revelers generally support. My problem is with one thing only: green dye.

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We Revelers in the New Old Tradition recognize a time of year we call “The Push,” which begins around February 1st and extends all the way to the Spring Equinox on or around March 21st. Admittedly, The Push is not a holiday you will find on any calendar outside of our tradition. You will not find its name on any government list of holidays. Nor will you find The Push mentioned in any text book, “A People’s History of…” or otherwise. No, The Push is unique to this band of merry makers and takes its cues from the times when we could all use a little help getting through what needs gettin’ through.

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